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weloveinterracial:

MARY SAYS: When I told my father I was going to marry Jake he said, ‘If you marry that man you will never set foot in this house again.’

He was horrified that I could contemplate marrying a black man, and I soon learned that most people felt the same way. The first years of our marriage living in Birmingham were hell — I cried every day, and barely ate. No one would speak to us, we couldn’t find anywhere to live because no one would rent to a black man, and we had no money.

Now it’s very hard to comprehend the prejudice we encountered, but you have to remember that there were hardly any black people in Britain in the Forties. I met Jake when he came over during the war from Trinidad, as part of the American forces stationed at the Burtonwood base near my home in Lancashire. We were at the same technical college. I was having typing and shorthand lessons and he’d been sent there for training by the Air Force. He was with a group of black friends and they called my friend and me over to talk. We didn’t even know they spoke English, but Jake and I got chatting. He quoted Shakespeare to me, which I loved.

A few weeks later we went for a picnic, but were spotted by a lady cycling past — two English girls with a group of black men was very shocking — and she reported me to my father, who banned me from seeing him again. Jake returned to Trinidad, but we carried on writing to each other, and a few years later he returned to the UK to get better paid work. 

He asked me to marry him, quite out of the blue, when I was only 19. My father threw me out, and I left with only one small suitcase to my name. No family came to our register office wedding in 1948.

But gradually life became easier. I got teaching jobs, ending up as a deputy head teacher. First Jake worked in a factory, then for the Post Office.

Slowly we made friends together, but it was so hard. I used to say to new friends: ‘Look, I have to tell you this before I invite you to my home — my husband is black.’

My father died when I was 30 and although we were reconciled by then, he never did approve of Jake.

Today we have been married for 63 years, and are still very much in love. I do not regret marrying him for an instant, despite all the pain we have suffered.

JAKE SAYS: I feel so fortunate to have met and married Mary, but it saddens me that we could not be accepted by society. Nowadays I say to young black people: ‘You have no idea what it used to be like.’

When I arrived in the UK I was subjected to abuse every day. Once I was on a bus and a man rubbed his hands on my neck and said: ‘I wanted to see if the dirt would come off.’

And back then you couldn’t work in an office — because a black man in an office with all the white girls wasn’t thought to be safe.



thecapn:

did you know that teachers are instructed to get in between two boys in an altercation and break their eye contact because boys will disengage once the immediate situation is interrupted but they’re instructed to like never ever get in between two girls in a fight because girls wont stop after they lose sight and will actively try to go through whatever’s in between them and teachers are supposed to wait for security to break the shit apart

teenage girls will fuck your shit up 

(Source: penisanxiety)

airyairyquitecontrary:

thenotsosilentmonk:

deducecanoe:

reservoircat:

Mutant 101 - Professor Xavier Should Put In A Call To Her Parents - 5 Year Old Mia Stares Down marvelentertainment's Cast Of Guardians Of The Galaxy As She Crushes Them In A Game Of GotG Trivia On jimmykimmellive [X

Vin Diesel in the background looking at her like “SHE’S PERFECT.  WANT ONE.”

I thought girls didn’t like Super Heroes.

You thought what? 

Also, bless five-year-old girls who can confidently pronounce the words ‘cybernetic enhancements’ because they’re so interested in superhero adventures that they saw no obstacle to learning anything at all to understand them better.

And can do it wearing a pink flower headband, if they feel like it.

GIRLS LIKE SUPERHEROES. GIRLS LIKE COMICS. GIRLS HAVE LIKED THESE THINGS FOR AS LONG AS THEY HAVE BEEN AVAILABLE TO LIKE. 

image

(behold, three girls and one boy avidly reading new comic books in New York City, 1947, photographed by Ruth Orkin)

What girls don’t like is when they’re patronised, and herded towards titles designed according to what grown men think girls are supposed to like, and ignored with regard to titles that those men assume are just for boys and men. What girls don’t like is not being allowed to choose for themselves what they like. 

This is not a new concept. This is noted in Chaucer. What every woman most desires is to choose her own way.

(Source: mutant-101)

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